Home > Uncategorized > Kosovo Army Built After Pentagon Model, NATO Standards

Kosovo Army Built After Pentagon Model, NATO Standards

United States European Command
January 14, 2013

International partnership among noncommissioned officers
Sgt. Angela Parady

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[T]he first conference of its kind to be held in Kosovo…was designed to not only aid in the development of NCOs, but also to network, to build relationships and share ideas on how to better train, develop and prepare soldiers for combat roles.

The conference brought together senior enlisted leaders from all of the Balkan states…They built relationships and discussed how to develop the NCO corps within their militaries based on the NATO standard.

When Kosovo was looking to develop its own military presence, they decided to base it on U.S. doctrine. They trained and built their forces like those in the U.S. Army. Every year they review and develop ways to integrate the NATO system.

In developing an NCO program to meet the NATO objectives, Maddocks pointed to the National Guard’s State Partnership Program. Through this program, over 60 countries have been partnered with Army National Guard units to help develop their economies, their military and their leadership.

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u-s-army-europe-command-sgt-maj-davis-s-davenport-sits-next-to-the-command-sg
U.S. Army Europe Command Sergeant Major Davis Davenport and Command Sergeant Major of the Kosovo Security Forces, Fetah Zejhullahu, at the Regional Senior Noncommissioned Officer Conference for the Land Forces Senior NCO and Senior Enlisted Leader in Pristina, Kosovo, January 14, 2013

PRISTINA, Kosovo: Senior level noncommissioned officers from the Balkans region met during the Regional Senior NCO Conference for the Land Forces Senior NCO and Senior Enlisted Leader in Pristina, Kosovo Monday.

This is the first conference of its kind to be held in Kosovo. U.S. Army Europe Command Sgt. Maj. David Davenport Sr., said that this conference was designed to not only aid in the development of NCOs, but also to network, to build relationships and share ideas on how to better train, develop and prepare soldiers for combat roles.

The two-day conference covered topics on development from the International Senior Enlisted Seminar, the role of NCO academies, and NATO’s role in NCO development…

As the region works to develop and advance its military structure, Kosovo is looking to gain insight from the Slovenians, Albanians, Montenegrins and others as they look to improve their security forces. The conference brought together senior enlisted leaders from all of the Balkan states, the U.S. Army Europe Command Sergeant Major, and the U.S. European Command Senior Enlisted Leader as well as representatives from the 7th Army Joint Multinational Training Command. They built relationships and discussed how to develop the NCO corps within their militaries based on the NATO standard.

When Kosovo was looking to develop its own military presence, they decided to base it on U.S. doctrine. They trained and built their forces like those in the U.S. Army. Every year they review and develop ways to integrate the NATO system. In 2009, the Ahtisaari Plan established the Kosovo Security Force, which according to NATO is a lightly armed force, comprised of 2,500 active and 800 reserve multi-ethnic members.

U.S. Europe Command’s Senior Enlisted Leader Fleet Master Chief Roy Maddocks said the conference brought together senior enlisted personnel in the region to discuss how to further improve and train professional NCOs. They also discussed NATO strategy and standards and offered recommendations to Kosovo Security Forces Commander, Lt. Gen. Kadri Kastrati and his staff on how to further build and develop the NCO Corps.

“The most important resource military leaders possess, is the human resource,” said Maddocks. ‘Whether it is within NATO, within alliances, it is the people who carry out the mission. Whether you are working regionally or independently, you have to develop a standard. A strategy that holds common among the partners.”

Maddocks said that by working together in professional forums such as this, and the International Senior Enlisted Seminar, key enlisted leaders are prepared for multinational environments that are increasingly complex and challenging. The conferences help to continue the development of a professional NCO corps…

“Once you have a common strategy, you can collaborate, cooperate on regional security issues,” said Maddocks. “So we have common strategies, developed relationships. Just by building relationships at these conferences, when it becomes necessary to work together as a security force, it is not the first time you have worked with that country. You already have rapport.”

In developing an NCO program to meet the NATO objectives, Maddocks pointed to the National Guard’s State Partnership Program. Through this program, over 60 countries have been partnered with Army National Guard units to help develop their economies, their military and their leadership. With common goals and common challenges, these state partnerships help foster long-term relationships…

Kosovo Security Force Command Sergeant Major Fetah Zejhullahu said this conference was targeted specifically for his senior leaders to work on their relationships amongst the regional armies, from Slovenia to Albania, and with KFOR and EUCOM.

Many of these countries have faced challenges in developing their militaries. Zejhullahu, who has served in the security forces here for the last 13 years, said that after the war Kosovo didn’t have an organized military or any structure for one.

“We looked around to see how we wanted to base the structure, the ideology and the doctrine,” he said. “A lot of the foreign military influence in the past had been negative, and we didn’t want to continue that way.”

Training side by side with NATO Kosovo Force supervision and mentorship has helped the development of this force.

“First we built the officer system, now we work on the NCOs,” said Zejhullahu about the development of the soldiers. “We are a small organization, but we want to be professional. Ready.”

Maddocks, who was deployed to Macedonia and Kosovo in 1998- 1999, said that regionally, the ability to share resources is key to developing the NCO support channels that really get things done. By understanding the shared challenges, they can look at how to share and allocate resources to best meet the goals and challenges that they face.

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  1. rosemerry
    January 25, 2013 at 7:47 am

    Not a word about drug and human trafficking, gunrunning, organ theft, Serbs being marginalised. Maddocks must be so proud.

    • AR
      January 26, 2013 at 7:06 am

      But…but… those things are the just the price of American/Western freedom and democracy!

      The Serbs and others should be grateful for these precious gifts of organ theft, drug/human trafficking, and gunrunning commited the USA’s stooges in the Balkans!

      Remember what the great American diplomat Donald Rumsfeld said about the looting that occurred in Iraq after the USA’s invasion of that nation:

      “Freedom is untidy”!

    • KS
      July 26, 2013 at 3:59 am

      Yeah, because Serbs are sooo innocent. How pathetic. 850,000 people fled because they were afraid for their lives. Even if those crimes were committed, everybody makes mistakes. Lets not forget what happened in Bosnia (Oh no, don’t bring up the ugly past!). Kosovo has every right to be independent, considering what Serbs have done compared to Albanians. What you people don’t get is that we wanted freedom. Adem Jashari built the KLA to protect the people of Kosovo and to gain freedom from Milosevic rule. Look at the amount of deaths of Albanian and Serb civilians in Kosovo. “In June 2000, the Red Cross reported that 3,368 civilians (2,500 Albanians, 400 Serbs, and 100 Roma) were still missing, nearly one year after the conflict.”Of that sum, 10,533 were Albanians, 2,238 were Serbs, 126 Roma, 100 Bosniaks and others.” This isn’t just random numbers. The Red Cross had found these bodies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosovo_War#Casualties. Anyway, I think that it is horrible how innocent people have died, including Serbs, but when you take into account the numbers of the two, Albanians suffered more.

      • richardrozoff
        July 26, 2013 at 12:58 pm

        Your friends in the KLA are guilty of killing numerous fellow ethnic Albanians (including in their own ranks), perhaps several thousands since 1998.
        The amount of non-Albanians – Serbs, Roma, Gorans, Egyptians, etc. – killed and driven out of Kosovo permanently since the KLA and NATO took over in June 1999 is far larger than any claim you can make about Albanian casualties and displacement.

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