Home > Uncategorized > France Echoes U.S. In Demanding Libyan Scenario For Syria

France Echoes U.S. In Demanding Libyan Scenario For Syria

Voice of Russia
August 28, 2012

Hollande repeats after Obama, or Libyan scenario for Syria
Oleg Severgin
Edited by RR

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It has been said many times that the rebels are guided by secret service professionals primarily from Great Britain, as well as from Germany and other NATO countries. It seems that authorities in those countries are willing to use in Syria the Libyan pattern, only on a larger scale. During her recent visit to Turkey, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton brought up the subject of creating a no-fly zone over Syria. Other NATO partners, who also use direct appeals to Bashar al-Assad to voluntarily give up his position, support that idea. It all looks familiar.

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In his annual address to the national diplomatic corps, French president Francois Hollande announced that his country together with its partners is “closely watching” the situation in Syria in regards to al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons. “For the international community the fact of use of the weapons of mass destruction would be a legitimate reason for a direct military intervention,” he said.

The announcement made by the French leader is remarkable not only in its content and its tone of an ultimatum. In fact Francois Hollande repeated word for word a similar threat made by the head of the White House, Barack Obama, shortly before that. France’s senior partner in NATO threatened to strike against al-Assad even if chemical weapons are simply moved from one place to another. And still, Hollande’s and Obama’s statements are remarkable not in their tone as much as in their readiness for military interference as well as in the lack of any mention of the UN’s role in the event of a potential military intervention by the West in Syria.

Naturally, experts could not fail to notice that detail. Also notable is the fact that lately the European mass media have openly voiced calls for a direct military intervention in the conflict in Syria. “Intervention in Syria is inevitable,” stated the German weekly Die Zeit. “Will the UN Security Council lean to this or that side, will it take the risk,” writes the weekly, “in any event the international community will be forced to intervene in the foreseeable future.”

A verdict also peremptory in a similar way was made by the Hannoversche Allgemeine Zeitung. “Syria will become yet another country in the Middle East that awaits a change of regime,” says the publication. “Of all the Arab dictators, only Gaddafi fought for preserving his power as frantically as does Bashar al-Assad.”

It is hard to tell whether it is a forecast or an obscure hint to those who are empowered to make decisions about the use of military force. The comparison of al-Assad to Gaddafi is quite demonstrative. The Austrian Die Presse has recently published an interesting article. It is called “A gunman from Dublin.” The main character in the article is Najjair, an Irishman of Libyan origin. First he fought in Libya, and then he illegally moved to Syria where he joined the rebels. He crossed the border along with hundreds of other hired guns that go there through the borders with Turkey, Iraq and Lebanon. Najjair received military training in Libya with the so-called Tripoli brigade. The newspaper writes that the training was conducted by “commandos” from Great Britain and Qatar. According to the publication, the “veterans” from Libya are passing their experience onto the rebels from the so-called Free Syrian Army.

It has been said many times that the rebels are guided by secret service professionals primarily from Great Britain, as well as from Germany and other NATO countries. It seems that authorities in those countries are willing to use in Syria the Libyan pattern, only on a larger scale. During her recent visit to Turkey, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton brought up the subject of creating a no-fly zone over Syria. Other NATO partners, who also use direct appeals to Bashar al-Assad to voluntarily give up his position, support that idea. It all looks familiar.

But Vladimir Anokhin, vice-president of the Russian Academy of Geopolitical Issues is skeptical.

“It would be fine and good for NATO to conduct this arrogant operation according to the Libyan scenario,” says the expert. “However, the situation is absolutely different. It is like in the saying ‘All cats love fish but fear to wet their paws.’ Why is Europe so cautious? Because there has been a precedent set. It seemed that all was set up in Libya for the oil to start pouring. But no, nothing like that happened.”

Nevertheless, the Die Zeit forecast about an imminent intervention in Syria gave out a warning: “Everybody has to be clear that what the world community is facing will be a lot more large-scale, long-term and expensive than the 7,587 air strikes made by NATO against Libya.” Nothing else need be added here.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. rosemerry
    August 29, 2012 at 7:03 am

    1. The Libya disaster is seen to be a success, like Iraq, now in ruins.
    2. Sovereignty of nations is now “kaput”.
    3.Arab “dictators” means only the independent ones.Saudi, UAE,Bahrain etc are our buddies.
    R2P seems never to have been suggested in Palestine.

  2. Hoarsewhisperer
    August 29, 2012 at 5:17 pm

    The French, like the “Israelis” and Americans, are too lily-livered and pussified to risk their lives ‘protecting’ anyone except themselves. The very fact that Hollande has switched into “me too” bluster mode is a pretty reliable indicator that a NATO attack on Syria has quietly slithered off the table.

    All this mock seriousness and tabloid grandstanding might not be so laughable if someone/anyone, made at least a passing reference to the elephant in the room and how NATO would deal with the implied threat of a Russian intervention in any NATO intervention.

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