Home > Uncategorized > No Replay: Russia Says NATO, Not Libyan People, Decided Gaddafi’s Fate

No Replay: Russia Says NATO, Not Libyan People, Decided Gaddafi’s Fate

Itar-Tass
June 21, 2012

Lavrov says Russia will not admit replay of Libyan scenario for Syria

MOSCOW: Russia will not admit a replay of the Libyan scenario in Syria, Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said in an interview with the Echo of Moscow liberal radio.

“It wasn’t the Libyan people who decided Gaddafi’s fate, it was NATO,” he said. “Nothing would have happened there without NATO’s bombings. Or, to be more precise, a reciprocal self-annihilation of the people would have continued, but NATO wouldn’t have gotten a mandate to take part in that war as one of the warring sides anyway.”

“That’s why Gaddafi’s plight is a somewhat different story but a replication of the Libyan scenario in Syria won’t be admitted, and we can guarantee this,” Lavrov said. “That’s why the parties to the Syrian conflict should take seats at the conference table and negotiate peace.”

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Interfax
June 21, 2012

Syrian govt, opposition should pull out troops from cities simultaneously – Lavrov

MOSCOW/ST. PETERSBURG: The Syrian government and the opposition should withdraw their troops from cities and other communities simultaneously under the UN observers’ control, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said.

Speaking to Echo Moskvy radio station on the sidelines of the St. Petersburg Economic Forum on Thursday, Lavrov said Russia could give its consent to increasing the number of UN military monitors in Syria.

“We deem it very important at this stage to make all the conflicting parties withdraw their armed units and military hardware from cities and other communities, but this must be done simultaneously,” Lavrov said.

“It happened earlier that the Syrian government, complying with an Arab League plan, left some cities last fall, and monitors reported that this happened, and then the government entered these cities again because opposition units had occupied them in the absence of government forces,” he said.

“There is a need for a plan of simultaneous withdrawal on both sides for each populated area under control of UN international monitors, the number of which we are prepared to increase,” he said.

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Interfax
June 21, 2012

Lavrov warns against Assad’s resignation

In an interview with Radio Ekho Moskvy on Thursday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov described as ‘unrealistic’ Western leaders’ demands for Syrian President Bashar Assad’s free-will resignation.

Lavrov slammed the West’s scheme which cites Assad’s resignation as the only way to halt the violence in Greece. He recalled that at least 50 percent of Syrians supported Assad’s party during the elections.

Separately, Lavrov commented on a statement by French President Francois Hollande who said that Assad’s stepping down should become a precondition for the resolution of the Syrian crisis.

The top Russian diplomat said that the West’s Syria policy may lead to radicals’ coming to power there, something that will, in turn, damage security interests of moderate Muslims and Christians.

Lavrov was speaking on the sidelines of the 2012 St. Petersburg International Economic Forum.

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Voice of Russia
June 21, 2012

Russia continues consultations on Syria conference

Russia continues consultations to pave the way for the holding of an international conference on Syria which was earlier initiated by Moscow, Russian Foreign Ministry Spokesman Alexander Lukashevich told reporters on Thursday.

He declined to elaborate.

Earlier this month, presidential aide Yuri Ushakov said that the conference could be held in Moscow or Geneva, and that the exact date was yet to be defined.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, for his part, voiced hope that the gathering will be attended by all permanent UN Security Council members and Syria’s immediate neighbors, as well as a host of key regional players and major international organizations.

Syria’s immediate neighbors include Iraq, Turkey, Jordan and Lebanon, while among key regional players are Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Iran.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. June 24, 2012 at 6:28 am

    In the above post richardrozoff quotes Lavrov saying on 21 Jun 2012:

    Lavrov said on 21 Jun 2012: “We deem it very important at this stage to make all the conflicting parties withdraw their armed units and military hardware from cities and other communities, but this must be done simultaneously…. It happened earlier that the Syrian government, complying with an Arab League plan, left some cities last fall, and monitors reported that this happened, and then the government entered these cities again because opposition units had occupied them in the absence of government forces. There is a need for a plan of simultaneous withdrawal on both sides for each populated area, under control of UN international monitors, the number of which we are prepared to increase.” http://www.interfax.com/newsinf.asp?pg=3&id=341628

    This long post is motivated that statement by Lavrov. My core position is that the violent rebellion in Syria can only be stopped by violence.

    I am a supporter of the Assad government. I say it was a mistake for the government to have agreed to the Annan plan. The requirement to withdraw the army from civilian areas was the only provision in the Annan plan that made it a bad thing for Syria to sign up to. The plan has enabled the rebels to strengthen on the ground without getting attacked by the army.

    I believe the Annan plan was essentially a Russian plan. Putin said on 1 Mar 2012 about Syria:

    “Instead of encouraging parties to the conflict, it’s necessary to force them to sit down for talks and begin political procedures and political reforms that would be acceptable for all participants in the conflict.” http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1139775–russia-s-putin-backs-away-from-syria-s-assad

    Likewise Lavrov said on 21 Jun 2012:

    “We strongly support a political dialogue and efforts to stop the violence. We suggest for this purpose that all external players should lean on the Syrian party on which they have influence and thus persuade them to withdraw from cities – both the government and opposition – and to sit down to dialogue. But there should be no prejudging from outside what the substance and result of this dialogue might be. It’s for the Syrians to decide.” http://www.rt.com/news/lavrov-syria-exclusive-394/ .

    Likewise Lavrov said on 15 Jun 2012:

    “What should be done if the showdown between the authorities and the opposition does assume the form of violent, armed confrontation? The answer seems obvious: external actors should do their best to stop the bloodshed and support a compromise involving all parties to the conflict.” http://www.mid.ru/bdomp/brp_4.nsf/0/D54B1EB2726D75F544257A1E003935A8 .

    I strongly disagree with that. I strongly agree instead with the Syrian foreign minister Al-Moallem when he said on 24 Jan 2012:

    “The security solution is a necessity, the necessity of which is clear with the presence of the so-called Free Syrian Army…. The security solution is a popular public demand.”

    Bashar Assad said the same in his speech on 10 Jan 2012 and again in his speech on 3 Jun 2012. He said the only thing that can bring peace and civility to Syria is to bring violent armed confrontation to the rebels and destroy the rebels with the force of arms:

    Bashar Assad on 10 Jan 2012: “Our utmost priority now, which is unparalleled by any other priority, is the restoration of the security we have enjoyed for decades, and which has characterized our country, not only in the region but throughout the world. This will only happen by striking these murderous terrorists hard. There is no compromise with terrorism, no compromise with those who use arms to cause chaos and division…. We cannot fight terrorism without fighting chaos, for both of them are linked…. This terrorism cannot appear like that suddenly. There are stages which started from the beginning. There was small-size terrorism using small arms and in small areas. Then it grew to reach this stage and this level.” http://www.sana.sy/eng/21/2012/01/11/393338.htm

    The armed rebellion or terrorism is now considerably worse than it was when Bashar said those words in January, due in no small part to the Annan plan under which the the Syrian army was severely constrained from suppressing the rebellion.

    To my knowledge the Syrian government spokespeople have never explained to the Syrian public why they agreed to the Annan plan. At least they’ve never explained it to me. Reading between the lines of their verbiage, I think they agreed to the plan because (a) they wanted to keep themselves and the Russians on the same page, and the Russians were leaning on them to do the plan; (b) they figured the adverse effects for law and order would wear off in the longer term, i.e. they figured their position was strong enough in Syria that the chaos resulting from the withdrawal of the army from the streets would be reversible after the plan expired; and (c) the hundreds of UN observers under the plan could help the foreign powers to better see the objective reality and offset the falsehoods of the foreign mass media outlets.

    The UN observer mission has been in Syria for two months now, and has complied many observations and many reports — and has published almost nothing. The UN observers appear to sincerely want to be objective and impartial. But, at the top of the UN organization a decision is being made to not publish these reports. Robert Mood said on 15 Jun 2012:

    “Would it be a good idea for the UN mission in Syria to share openly with the news media all our reports and all our findings? Well, for the time being that’s not my choice. That’s very simple. I have a reporting chain. I report to the headquarters in New York and Geneva. It’s their decision…. I think we probably could be more pro-active in information dissemination.” http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=4W0Rq9-_dfc#t=63s

    “This terrorism cannot appear like that suddenly…. There was small-size terrorism using small arms and in small areas. Then it grew to reach this stage and this level.” The Syrian government and people would have been better off with the “security solution” and no the Annan plan. Now there’s no use crying over spilt milk. But the government must not let the Russians lean on them again.

    On 7 Nov 2011 the Russian Foreign Ministry said that “it is a natural duty for the Syrian authorities to guarantee security and rights of its citizens and the general stability”. http://www.sana.sy/eng/22/2011/11/07/380434.htm . That is the position that the Russians and everybody else with goodwill for Syria should be upholding today.

    Bashar Assad said on 3 Jun 2012: “To cure the homeland we must fight terrorism [i.e.: fight the violent rebellion]. Consequently, there is no tolerance and no leniency towards terrorism or those who support it. There is no tolerance except with those who have abandoned it. We will continue to confront it decisively…. We are always ready to start dialogue without conditions, except with the forces which are dealing with foreign powers and which have turned themselves into agents of these powers and those who have called for foreign intervention, or those who have directly engaged in supporting terrorism.” http://www.sana.sy/eng/21/2012/06/04/423234.htm

    To stay true to the above words, and prevent the rebellion from growing worse, Bashar must not consent again to any plan that leaves the troubled populated areas undefended by troops. Consequently, Syria and Bashar must break away from Russia and Lavrov.

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