Home > Uncategorized > Stop NATO news: January 28, 2012

Stop NATO news: January 28, 2012

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New U.S. Army Stresses Space, Interceptor Missile, Cyber Capabilities

Canadian Troops, 155-Vehicle Convoy Head To Arctic

NATO’s Afghan War Distribution Network And The Baltic States

NATO Requirements: Baltic Lands Forces Integrated Into Danish Division

NATO Allies To Observe U.S.-South Korea-Japan War Games

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New U.S. Army Stresses Space, Interceptor Missile, Cyber Capabilities

http://blog.al.com/huntsville-times-business/2012/01/space_missile_defense.html

Huntsville Times
January 27, 2012

General says space, missile defense critical tools for a smaller, restructured Army
By Kenneth Kesner

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama: The economic challenges faced by the nation will lead to military force reductions and program changes and a different future for all, including the Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command, said Lt. Gen. Richard Formica.

But as tough decisions are made, the SMDC leader said it’s critical – especially to a smaller Army and the envisioned “joint force” – that commanders and troops not be denied access to space and cyberspace capabilities.

“If the Army wants to be able to shoot, move and communicate, it needs space. [I]t needs missile defense,” Formica said Thursday, addressing the Air, Space and Missile Defense Association’s annual meeting.

“I believe that exploiting the potential of space and missile defense capabilities will be more important in the future, where conflicts will take place in domains without boundaries, and where forward presence may be reduced,” he said.

The luncheon was held amid exhibits of Huntsville’s space history and technology in the Davidson Center for Space Exploration at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center. That’s where an ASMDA civilian “Wall of Honor” is now featuring portraits of men and women who have made significant contributions to missile defense over the decades.

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Canadian Troops, 155-Vehicle Convoy Head To Arctic

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/story/2012/01/23/edmonton-military-trek-arctic.html

CBC
January 23, 2012

Military convoy begins trek to the Arctic

Hundreds of military vehicles and personnel are beginning a three-day trek from CFB Edmonton to Yellowknife to test themselves and their gear in a harsh winter environment.

Soldiers from 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group learn how to properly pack a toboggan in preparation for the Exercise Arctic Ram. (Courtesy: DND)
The military convoy consists of three large groups travelling on separate dates:

* 90 soldiers and 50 vehicles will travel Jan. 20-22.

* 230 soldiers and 80 vehicles will travel Jan. 25-27.

* 60 soldiers and 25 vehicles will travel Feb. 9-11.

All vehicles will be further broken down into ‘packets’ of about 10 vehicles for reasons of safety and to alleviate congestion on highways.

The convoys will stop for rest and refueling at specified stops along the way. Fuel trucks will be travelling with the convoy.

The training exercise called ARCTIC RAM 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group’s first to be conducted in the Northwest Territories.

Exercise ARCTIC RAM, from Feb. 14 to 26, will re-familiarize soldiers with northern operations by assessing their ability to operate in a cold winter climate, test all personnel and equipment, and help soldiers to develop an awareness of the unique requirements of Arctic operations.

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NATO’s Afghan War Distribution Network And The Baltic States

http://www.state.gov/t/pm/rls/rm/182317.htm

U.S. Department of State
January 20, 2012

The Northern Distribution Network and the Baltic Nexus
Remarks
Thomas P. Kelly
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
Remarks at the Commonwealth Club, Washington
Washington, DC
As prepared

-The NDN has many paths. For example, there is a multi-modal route which enters the NDN at Poti, Georgia or Mersin, Turkey, and then transits the Caucasus and Central Asia. But the Baltic Republics offer a particularly important set of embarkation points for the surface routes to Afghanistan. The first shipment of U.S. cargo on the NDN was completed March 14, 2009, on a route that originated in Riga, Latvia, and continued through Russia into Afghanistan.

Minister Masiulis, Ambassador Pavilionis, Ambassador Nauduzas, Minister Rivasseau, distinguished guests, and friends:

It’s a great pleasure for me to participate on this panel sponsored by my Lithuanian friends. I spent three happy years in Vilnius as Deputy Chief of Mission, and one of the greatest benefits of my return to Washington a few months ago is the opportunity to collaborate with our Lithuanian friends and allies once again. This morning, I’d like to make some brief comments on the rationale for the Northern Distribution Network, ending with a few remarks on the role played by our stalwart allies in the Baltic Republics.

By way of introduction, I represent the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs in the Department of State, known colloquially as PM. We serve as in-house State Department experts on military and security assistance issues, and we are one of the key interlocutors for foreign governments on strategic security issues. We also serve as a bridge to the Department of Defense. When the DoD needs diplomats to accomplish U.S. security goals abroad, PM is on the job.

One of PM’s top priorities over the past few years has been to do the diplomatic work necessary to ensure that our soldiers in Afghanistan are properly supplied. As a landlocked country surrounded by some of the world’s highest mountains, Afghanistan has always posed logistical challenges. For both the Departments of Defense and State, establishing a northern supply route to supplement the traditional routes through Pakistan has been a priority since 2009. By definition, additional supply routes increase our operational flexibility, enabling us to more effectively move items in and out of Afghanistan to support the efforts of our troops and our allies.

With the help of our friends in Central Asia, the Baltic Republics, and Russia, the United States managed to establish a network of land, sea and air routes that approach Afghanistan from the north. We now refer to this as the Northern Distribution Network, or NDN. The NDN consists of integrated routes of transportation to bring cargo along commercial surface and air networks to our troops serving in Afghanistan.

The NDN team in the U.S. Government includes PM; the Bureaus of European and South and Central Asian Affairs at the State Department; the U.S. Transportation Command; the U.S. Central Command; the Defense Logistics Agency; the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and the Joint Staff. At PM, our key responsibility in this area is to secure international transit agreements that support the NDN.

Together with our partner nations along the network, we have transformed logistic support to Afghanistan in a relatively short period. Starting in March 2009, we began using existing rail and road infrastructure. To date, more than 58,000 containers of construction material, food, water, and other general supplies for U.S. forces in Afghanistan have been delivered via the NDN.

We have come a long way in building the NDN, but we hope to do more. Ultimately, we seek to ship 750 containers of cargo per week through the NDN. To put that goal in perspective, we deliver the equivalent of about 1,100 containers of cargo each week to Afghanistan from all routes.

The NDN has many paths. For example, there is a multi-modal route which enters the NDN at Poti, Georgia or Mersin, Turkey, and then transits the Caucasus and Central Asia. But the Baltic Republics offer a particularly important set of embarkation points for the surface routes to Afghanistan. The first shipment of U.S. cargo on the NDN was completed March 14, 2009, on a route that originated in Riga, Latvia, and continued through Russia into Afghanistan.

Riga was the primary point of embarkation in the Baltics initially. But we also send NDN Cargo through Tallinn, Estonia and one of my favorite cities, Klaipeda, Lithuania. Because of Lithuania’s strong contributions to Operation Enduring Freedom and the competitiveness of Klaipeda, Lithuania was added to the NDN in December 2010. Since then, it has facilitated the movement of over 4,000 containers of vital sustainment material to our troops in Afghanistan. I know that Minister Masiulis visited TRANSCOM two days ago, and that there are plans afoot for further modernization of the port facilities in Klaipeda…

Since its independence from the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, Lithuania and its sister Baltic republics of Latvia and Estonia have always been responsive to the United States. I’d just like to reiterate today what I’ve told many of my friends from the Baltics – your willingness to help us when we need your help does not go unnoticed. This kind of collaboration gives me great confidence in the staying power of our nation’s alliance with all three of the Baltic republics.

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NATO Requirements: Baltic Lands Forces Integrated Into Danish Division

http://www.baltic-course.com/eng/baltic_news/?doc=8584

Baltic Course
January 20, 2012

Baltic land forces to be integrated in Danish Division by end-2013

-The Defense Ministry emphasizes that the integration of the Infantry Brigade into the Danish Division will consolidate Latvia’s military capacity, improve the planning and performance of military operations, and standardize cooperation between the Baltic and Danish units pursuant to NATO requirements.

Riga: By December 31, 2013, the Land Force Infantry Brigade of the National Armed Forces, as well as the brigades of the Estonian and Lithuanian armed forces, will be integrated into the Danish Division, writes LETA.

According to the government’s action plan released by the government this week, which will be altered and supplemented in accordance with proposals received from non-governmental organizations and other expert groups, the integration of the Latvian Land Force battalion into the Danish Division will be funded with state budget money provided to the Defense Ministry.

During the implementation of the three Baltic countries’ joint unit, the Baltic Battalion (BALTBAT), close military cooperation developed with the Scandinavian countries, including Denmark, the Defense Ministry’s Press Department. As part of this cooperation, significant support was provided for BALTBAT, thereby consolidating the National Armed Forces’ capacity.

After the BALTBAT project was halted and the Land Force Infantry Battalion set up, it became obvious that quality and adequate support for the battalion’s training was necessary.

This support has been provided by the Danish Division since 2005.

The continuation of the cooperation between the three Baltic countries and Denmark should be considered as a continuation of the BALTBAT project, albeit on a higher level, and it proves that the Baltic countries wish to continue stable cooperation in the long term, the Defense Ministry informs

The Defense Ministry emphasizes that the integration of the Infantry Brigade into the Danish Division will consolidate Latvia’s military capacity, improve the planning and performance of military operations, and standardize cooperation between the Baltic and Danish units pursuant to NATO requirements.

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NATO Allies To Observe U.S.-South Korea-Japan War Games

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/asia/US-South-Korea-to-Hold-Joint-Military-Exercises-138187854.html

Voice of America News
January 27, 2012

US, South Korea to Hold Joint Military Exercises
Steve Herman

Seoul: The United States and South Korea are to hold two military exercises on the Korean peninsula soon. They will be the first such war games since the recent change of leadership in North Korea.

There had been speculation one or both of the joint U.S.-South Korean military drills might be postponed or called off this year. But on Friday, the U.S. and South Korea militaries announced the annual exercises would go ahead.

A command post exercise, named “Key Resolve” is to start on February 27. It will involve 2,100 U.S. personnel, including 800 coming from Japan and elsewhere, as well as the participation of 200,000 South Korean troops.

Members of the U.N. Command, as well as officers from Australia, Britain, Canada, Denmark and Norway, are to observe.

It will overlap with the start of a two-month joint tactical field exercise, known as “Foal Eagle.” The training is to involve 11,000 U.S. forces, along with a still undecided number of South Korean military divisions and smaller-sized units.

Foal Eagle, is to run from March 1 through April 30.

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Categories: Uncategorized
  1. rosemerry
    January 28, 2012 at 7:26 am

    Anything for more war! Iran is a big target, but Russia and China will be even better! Our main horror for the future would be if peace ever broke out.

    “To date, more than 58,000 containers of construction material, food, water, and other general supplies for U.S. forces in Afghanistan have been delivered via the NDN.”

    This shows our ability to waste in the service of destroying a poor country. If Israel were to allow containers like this, or even a few trucks into Gaza, our poor little best friend would disappear from the face of the earth.

    Former USSR lands are now our friends. Ah yes. Read any Michael Hudson article to see how friendly you have been to Latvia, now a basket case of debt and loss by the 99%, gain by European banks.

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